Why Christians eat pork

Leviticus ch. 11 is all about clean and unclean animals and what the Israelites in Old Testament times could and couldn’t eat.

Therefore, every time someone hunted, ate a meal, went to a petting zoo, or came across roadkill, they had to ask themselves, “Is this clean or unclean?”

Land animals. Sea animals. Insects. Clean or unclean?

You shall not make yourselves detestable with any swarming thing that swarms, and you shall not defile yourselves with them, and become unclean through them. For I am the Lord your God. Consecrate yourselves therefore, and be holy, for I am holy. You shall not defile yourselves with any swarming thing that crawls on the ground.  For I am the Lord who brought you up out of the land of Egypt to be your God. You shall therefore be holy, for I am holy.” (Leviticus 11:43-45)

Ch. 12 is all about childbirth and how that made one unclean.

Ch. 13 is all about skin diseases and mould on clothes and how that made one unclean.

Ch. 14 is all about skin diseases and mildew in houses and how that made one unclean.

Ch. 15 is all about different bodily discharges and how that made one unclean.

What was the point of all these rules?

The point of the rules was not personal hygiene, but a picture or symbol of sin.

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Are you an obvious or undercover sinner?

Most people don’t think they need their sins forgiven

Most people think that they are not as bad as Adolf Hitler, they’re not a serial murderer, they’re not corrupt like the Gupta’s and they’re generally nice people, so they really don’t need their sins forgiven.  They don’t understand why Christians keep going on and on about the forgiveness of sin.

Let me share an illustration that I heard recently.*

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Don’t be hoodwinked this Easter

The cross was not a sad mistake, as some may think, but crucial to the mission of Jesus.

At the cross, Jesus made a once-for-all sacrifice for the sins of the world.  He made propitiation to God for all the sins of all of God’s people throughout all the ages.

Jesus’ death is central to Christianity.

The symbol for Christianity, is not an empty tomb or a dove, but a cross.

The importance of the cross may seem self-evident, but a characteristic of prosperity preachers, with their false theology and ”victorious” version of Christianity, is that they downplay the importance of the cross.  They speak about victory, anointing and breakthrough; but they seldom speak about the sin-bearing death of Jesus.

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The Christians’ struggle with sin

Often as Christians we’re discouraged by sin in our lives.  We’ve come to faith in Jesus, we’ve received the gift of the Holy Spirit and we want to life lives that honour God.

And yet we still lose our temper, still succumb to sexual sin, still covet our neighbour’s donkey or BMW, still tell lies, still steal lustful looks, still gossip at work, and still think racist thoughts.  We continue to sin.

We may be overcome with a sense of failure and disappointment.

We may lose our assurance that we belong to God.

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The hatefulness of LGBT-affirming churches

Many churches today have embraced the new sexual revolution in the name of love.

“As long as people love one another and are true to themselves”, is the new battle-cry.

These LGBT-affirming churches say that they are very loving and caring to affirm same-sex relationships, same-sex marriage and the notions of transgender and gender fluidity.

Churches and church leaders not affirming LGBT relationships are lampooned as bigots, homophobic and hatemongers.

In stark contrast, the letter of 1 John in the New Testament (the letter of love!), says that the LGBT-affirming churches and leaders are not acting in love, but rather in hate, because they are not telling those in their care the truth about sin.

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The Bible and racism

Years ago, in South Africa, you were classified according to the colour of your skin and the coarseness of your hair.  You were told where you could and couldn’t live.  You were told which bus you could and couldn’t ride. You we told who you could and couldn’t marry.   Racism is part of our history.  South Africa, the USA and many other countries have struggled and continue to struggle with racism.

A good definition of racism is: an explicit or implicit belief or practice that distinguishes or values one race over other races.

A racist believes that their race, whatever it may be, is superior to other races.

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Killing me softly

Christians never set out to be caught in scandalous sin.

The pastor never set out to have an adulterous affair.  The member of his church first came to see him after her close friend had died. She came for counselling to help her grieve.

They cried together and hugged and made another appointment.  

At the next appointment, the pastor held her hand – he thought it would be a comfort – and when she left, after they made another appointment, they hugged again and shared a quick kiss.  Meanwhile the pastor himself was feeling stressed out and undervalued; finally, there was someone who really appreciated his ministry. 

The church appointments became home visits.  The hugs lingered.  The kissing increased.  And they ended up sleeping together.

Until one day, her husband arrived home early.

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